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DALLAS, Aug. 21, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Amid the proliferation of real time data from sources such as mobile devices, web, social media, sensors, log files and transactional applications, Big Data has found a host of vertical market applications, ranging from fraud detection to R&D. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140821/138541 "Big Data Market: 2014 – 2020 – Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies, Industry Verticals & Forecasts" Key Findings: In 2014 Big Data vendors will pocket nearly $30 Billion from hardware, software and professional services revenues Big Data investments are further expected to grow at a CAGR of nearly 17% over the next 6 years, eventually accounting for $76 Billion by the end of 2020 The market is ripe for acquisitions of pure-play Big Data startups, as competition heats up between IT incumbents Nearly every large scale IT ven... (more)

SYS-CON's Virtualization Journal Opens Its "Readers' Choice Awards" Nominations

SYS-CON's Virtualization Journal announced today its first annual Virtualization Readers' Choice Awards. SYS-CON's Readers' Choice Awards, also known as the "Oscars of the Software Industry" has been one of the most prestigious industry award programs for more than a decade. This year's virtualization awards will be given in 17 categories and award-winning products and services will be selected by Virtualization Journal readers. Virtualization takes the cost and complexity out of IT, and can even help us reduce the CO2 footprint. IDC has stated that the virtualization services market alone is going to reach $11.7 billion by 2011 and in general this technology, which has been around for a good number of years, seems suddenly to be on everyone's mind. In short, Virtualization is fast becoming a key requirement for every server in the data center, enabling increased work... (more)

Exclusive Linux.SYS-CON.com Interview: Where Is Sun Going with Linux?

Linux.SYS-CON.com's senior contributing analyst, Bill Claybrook, spoke with John Loiacono, executive vice president of Sun Microsystem's Software Group about his new job, and what he has in store for Sun's Linux strategy. You replaced Jonathan Schwartz several months ago as Sun's software leader. Jonathan was very visible. Is this the way you are going to do it? In my previous job as VP of Sun's operating platforms group, I was more visible than over the past few months simply because we were making some changes internally regarding implementation strategy. Not the strategy itself, but how we were going to get things done, and how we were going to deploy some of the things that we had been talking about. Jonathan is a great visionary and paints a good picture, and he hired me to make sure that things happen. Now we are making some course corrections, not changes. Cour... (more)

Sun Fire V40z Server

With their Sun Fire V40z Server, Sun is moving into new realms in three different ways. First, it's a move onto a new hardware platform - namely the AMD Opteron CPU. Second, it's a move into the 64-bit arena on a platform other than their familiar UltraSPARC environment. Third is the adoption of a mainstream Linux distribution as a primary operating system choice. We tested a V40z with four Opteron 848 processors, each with 2GB (total of 8GB) and two 73GB Ultra320 SCSI drives. Designed for the Data CenterThe V40z is definitely designed for the data center. With 12 internal fans, the machine is far too noisy to sit anywhere but in a dedicated server room. The airflow is specially designed to suck in air from the front and expel it out of the rear of the machine and the force is strong enough, even in the fully packed review unit, for you to feel a noticeable suction a... (more)

Linux.SYS-CON.com Cover Story: Rapid Cluster Deployment

After building a number of clusters from the ground up -including one that made it to the Top500 Supercomputer list - I decided to try a service that many vendors now offer - having a system racked and stacked at the factory then shipped to us. Such a service saves a huge amount of time, not to mention my back, not having to build the cluster and cable all the equipment together. I've been a fan of well-cabled systems and have found the quality control to be acceptable. The key component is the pre-build requirements and verification before the system is built. This will ensure the system shipped is what is expected when it arrives at your front door. There can still be a fair amount of cabling that has to be done once it arrives, if you have a multi-rack configuration, but it's usually limited to plugging in the system's power and public network. Once this is done... (more)

Adobe Wants to Be on the iPhone and Will "Reorganize" Its Mobile and Device Business Unit

Novell has closed on its acquisition of PlateSpin Ltd, whose widgetry can move workloads between physical and virtual environments regardless of platform or OS. Novell is pairing it with its systems management technology and making it part of its Systems and Resource Management Group. Adobe To Do Something about Jobs’ Slurs Rumor has it that in the next few weeks Adobe is going to “reorganize” its Mobile and Device business unit where its Jobs-criticized Flash Lite lives and send the engineers to go work with the larger platform effort and Flash proper, which Jobs has also criticized. Presumably, Adobe is going to do what it takes to appease Jobs. It does want to be on the iPhone and needs Apple’s help. This and No More: Microsoft The Wall Street Journal, still wary of what may only be a cunning strategy, has now been relatively persu... (more)

AMD vs Intel Update: AMD Can't Keep a Secret

AMD is supposed to use Opteron's second-anniversary party in New York on April 21 to launch its dual-core Opteron chip thereby beating out Intel, which isn't supposed to launch its dual-core widget until May. See, it's tradition in the microprocessor business that the first one out is supposed to dominate the market. AMD's will be a dual-core server chip. Intel's not supposed to have a dual-core Xeon until next year. That means that to prevent AMD from getting too much of a head start Intel will have to get its server minions pairing the Smithfield Pentium chip with the Lindenhurst chipset, which will at least give them a one-way dual-core Intel configuration. The dual-core Opterons are supposed to be good for quads.   ... (more)

Making Sense of Virtualization

Companies are finding it increasingly difficult to manage their enterprise data centers as they become highly complex, expensive to build out, and difficult to reconfigure as needs change. In an effort to address these challenges, many IT professionals are turning to virtualization technologies. Virtualization addresses a number of these issues and offers a variety of benefits including hardware utilization, operational efficiency, and data center agility. However, many customers and their technology partners are becoming increasingly frustrated with the proprietary and expensive nature of the available virtualization software solutions. Luckily, a new wave of virtualization-related technologies is emerging to address these challenges and improve the economics of virtualization. These emerging solutions are enabling a more dynamic IT infrastructure that helps transf... (more)

Sun: a 3-Letter Word Meaning (Says McNealy) "Low-Cost Computing"

Opening COMDEX 2003 this morning in Las Vegas, Scott McNealy - chairman, president, and CEO of Sun Microsystems - had one thing to say above all about the future of technology: "The network is still the computer." "Through all of the noise and the stock meltdown," McNealy said, "the network remains. The network is everywhere. Those who think it's not happening are missing the bet." Considered by many to be potentially one of the most important addresses he has given since the incorporation of the company in February 1982, McNealy then went on to describe Sun's three-pronged attack on IT - with something for those running data centers, something for developers, and something for the end user. Scott McNealy in action on the keynote stage at the first day of COMDEX 2003 with John Loiacono, head of Sun's operating systems products. Photo Copyright SYS-CON Media Re-Stati... (more)

Sun Brings Array of New Products and Services to LinuxWorld

This week at LinuxWorld, Sun Microsystems previewed a number of products and roadmaps for Linux support of the Sun Java Enterprise System, Java Studio development tools, and new AMD Opteron processor-based x86 systems. The innovations previewed at LinuxWorld are focused on three key areas: 1) Next-generation desktop technologies including the next version of the Sun Java Desktop System, future management features for the Java Desktop System that allow full control over the desktop experience, Linux on ultra-thin Sun Ray client systems and a radical new 3-D, Java technology-based PC interface (code named "Project Looking Glass"). 2) Enterprise Software and Hardware: Sun will demonstrate the Sun Java Enterprise System at its LinuxWorld booth, January 21-23. The Java Enterprise System began shipping in December 2003 and will be available supporting the Linux OS later thi... (more)

Multi-Core and Massively Parallel Processors

As software developers we have enjoyed a long trend of consistent performance improvement from processor technology. In fact, for the last 20 years processor performance has consistently doubled about every two years or so. What would happen in a world where these performance improvements suddenly slowed dramatically or even stopped? Could we continue to build bigger and heavier, feature-rich software? Would it be time to pack up our compilers and go home? The truth is, single threaded performance improvement is likely to see a significant slowdown over the next one to three years. In some cases, single-thread performance may even drop. The long and sustained climb will slow dramatically. We call the cause behind this trend the CLIP level. C - Clock frequency increases have hit a thermal wall L - Latency of processor-to-memory requests continues as a key performance... (more)